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Hy-Vee investing $90 million in store remodels

Hy-Vee customers in the Kansas City area may soon notice a new look inside their local grocery store. Hy-Vee is remodeling 14 of its Kansas and Missouri locations in the area to include unique food service offerings, new departments, updated signage, enhanced health and wellness services and — in some cases — refreshed convenience stores. Construction is already under way at several locations, with most remodels expected to be complete by early 2020.hyv

“Hy-Vee has a proud history in the Kansas City metro area, opening our first store in Overland Park in 1988,” said Jeremy Gosch, executive vice president, co-chief operating officer and chief retail officer for Hy-Vee. “Thirty-one years later, we have 24 stores serving Kansas City, Lawrence, Topeka and Manhattan and are excited to make this nearly $90 million investment in an area that has been a great home to Hy-Vee.”

The scope of the renovation and department updates will vary by location; however, general renovations include new foodservice options such as Mia Pizza, Hibachi and sushi islands, Basin and beauty department expansions, relocation and upgrade of existing in-store Starbucks locations, HealthMarket expansions, new floral departments, gifting departments, the addition of Joe Fresh clothing, self-checkout lanes and the rebranding of existing Hy-Vee Gas locations to Hy-Vee Fast & Fresh Express locations.

Twelve stores are being or have been remodeled, and several additional stores in the area will be remodeled starting in 2020.

Included in the company’s $90 million investment is Hy-Vee’s Kansas City Fulfillment Center, which will open later this fall to serve the area’s Hy-Vee Aisles Online grocery pickup and delivery customers.

In 2018, Hy-Vee strengthened its connection with the community when it became the naming rights partner for Hy-Vee Arena (formerly Kemper Arena) as part of the revitalization efforts of Kansas City’s Stockyard District.